Unmatched turtle `` Diego '' who stopped mating and stopped the extinction of the species with one animal to retire active



The retirement of the Espanola giant tortoise ' Diego ', which has saved more than 800 offspring after the age of 100 and has saved the extinction of its species with just one animal, has been announced. Major news outlets, such as CNN and The Guardian, have reported on each of the articles that retired Diego.

Parque Nacional Galápagos-posts

https://www.facebook.com/parquegalapagos/posts/2501860959924937

Sex machine: prolific Galápagos tortoise saves his species | Environment | The Guardian
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jan/13/tortoise-saves-species-sex-drive-galapagos-

Diego the sexy tortoise saved his species from extinction. Now he's back for more-CNN
https://edition.cnn.com/2020/01/11/americas/diego-playboy-tortoise-sex-life-galapagos-scli-intl/

Espanola Giant Tortoise (Chelonoidis hoodensis) is a large tortoise that lives on Espanola Island , which belongs to the Galapagos Islands . When the Galapagos National Park began its breeding program, there were only 15 wild Espanola giant tortoises on Espanola Island, literally threatened with extinction.

However, among those 15 was Diego, who had outstanding energy. At the start of the program, Diego was over 100 years old, but Diego succeeded in producing more than 800 offspring with the assigned females. Approximately 2,000 Espanola giant tortoises were generated by the entire program, of which approximately 40% were born through Diego's 'Pregnancy'.



Following the birth of a large number of offspring, the eradication of alien species, and the successful cultivation of feeding cacti, the Galapagos National Park Authority has decided to end the breeding program. The end of the Diego seed rescue effort has come to an end. 'We used a variety of mathematical models to predict populations after 100 years, and concluded that the population had recovered enough to maintain the population without continuing the program,' said Washington Tapia, the program's leader. I think it is. '

The decline in Espanola tortoise populations is thought to be due to overfishing of pirate and whaling vessels for food and oil in the mid-1800s.

in Creature, Posted by log1k_iy