Interview with VFX director Toshio Miike, special effects of the movie “Fukushima 50”, how did you tackle the difficult subject?



On March 11, 2011, the tsunami following the Great East Japan Earthquake with a magnitude of 9.0 and a maximum seismic intensity of 7 caused the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station to lose all power. At this time, a movie depicting people who struggled with unprecedented situations at the nuclear power plant Fukushima ( Fukushima ) 50 ( Fifty ) 'is. In this work, a large open set and CG based on miniature special effects were used together to reproduce the nuclear power plant, so while special effects / VFX director Toshio Miike also showed the actual storyboard etc, I heard about movies and the special effects 'now'.

Movie 'Fukushima 50' Official Site |

https://www.fukushima50.jp/

◆ About the movie “Fukushima 50”
GIGAZINE (G):
How did Miike decide to participate in this work?

Mr. Toshio Miike (hereinafter, Miike):
Mr. Shinichiro Inoue, Vice President of KADOKAWA, talked directly. At a stage when I didn't know the title or content, I received a phone call saying, 'Would you like me to do this because there are some works that use special effects?', And then the original movie was sent. I've been focusing on entertainment films so far, so I felt 'this time it's my responsibility.' After that, I looked at various materials, books, and NHK documentaries, and studied hard.



G:
In this work, I think that the nuclear power plant itself is one of the protagonists as well as those who struggled at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Although it has been seen many times in the news, this time, the reactor building of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant appears as if it was taken locally. You mentioned that you used both open sets and CG. Which area was made with CG?

Miike:
The building was blown off by a hydrogen explosion, so no nuclear power remains before the accident. In addition, it is impossible to shoot on-site in any scene because of the situation toward decommissioning. So, we decided to make the building with CG. Around the ground, such as a service building where staff members are moving around, is reproduced with a vast open set made for shooting.

G:
So that's it.

Miike:
The art designer is

Koji Seshita , and the open set was created on the site of the valve factory on the shores of Lake Suwa. Because it was a very large site, I took pictures of the area that can be taken as it is, but I added CG to the pictures that pulled further and entered the building.

G:
For example, there is a scene where SDF people are moving around the building at the time of water injection, but what if the building in the background is a composite?

Miike:
That's right. The lower part of the building is shot in the range made with the open set, but other than that, the cut that goes up to the upper part of the building is synthesized with VFX. In today's movie, there is almost no shooting with a fixed camera, and the camera is always moving. Combining moving pictures was technically difficult a long time ago, but now it can be done without discomfort.

G:
So that's it. It seems difficult for the audience to distinguish between a set and a composition.

Miike:
Our role was to have the customer see it as if they were at the site at the time, so we thought that we had to make it a level that would not make you feel the composition.

G:
This time, I heard that you first made a miniature and then turned it into a CG based on it. I think it is possible to improve the details after becoming a CG, but how much do you make at the time of miniature?

Miike:
I think it depends on the work. I don't need to make that much detail if it's for a study, but for this miniature, I'm going to actually shoot and use the miniature, so I've built the details. You can make a video with CG without making a miniature from the beginning, but you don't know the final quality until CG is completed. Once you make a three-dimensional object, everyone can say that 'quality assurance' or 'aim for something of this quality'.

G:
Oh, yeah.

Miike:
For the CG department, if there is a three-dimensional object that is the basis, the CG base is established simply by scanning. In times of tight time and budget, they agreed that a little clue would be helpful. It's not like 'miniature vs. CG', it's a way to take advantage of each other. It was a 1 / 50th scale in size, but the details were quite fine. Both when safe and when broken by a hydrogen explosion.

Here is a miniature photo of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Unit 2 building.



G:
You didn't just make things that were safe and processed them with CG after the explosion.

Miike:
The explosion itself is CG, but we made two types of miniature buildings before and after the explosion. If there is a miniature first, there is a sense of security that the video will be at least that much. CG can make a really real thing if the conditions are met, but as I said, the final finish is hard to see. Miniatures are guaranteed to be completed. It's a guarantee for the director and the CG staff.

G:
When the miniature is completed, you can see that you can rest assured of this quality because you scan it.

Miike:
That's it. Therefore, the surface of the building looks flat in the distance, but when approaching, the texture of the surface, the grooves, and the outer stairs are included.

G:
Mr. Miike is

the third in a diary serialized in the daily Web Town Information Kumamoto in conjunction with the “ Kumamoto Castle × Special effects art castle keep reproduction project exhibition ”, “When shooting movies, we do not make parts that are usually invisible from the camera. I rarely make the entire surface, so I omit the back of the main position. ' Since Kumamoto Castle is the leading role, it is said that we made it in all directions, but in this work, it is a movie, but it is a scan material, so did you make the entire surface like Kumamoto Castle? Isn't it hard?

Miike:
This time, it is all directions. It's common for filmmakers to make things where they need it and not to make things that don't show. This time it was for scanning purposes, so there was no difficulty in making the entire surface.

Building miniature after explosion



Bare steel bars have been precisely reproduced



G:
How many people do miniature production itself?

Miike:
The special effects designer is Masato Inazuki , and the miniature production is handled by Marbling Fine Arts , who has been taking care of special effects movies such as Godzilla and Gamera for many years. As a miniature staff, we do about four people. I guess there are about 6 people in the scan group and the steel group in the CG department. It was a very small work.

G:
By 'going to make a CG based on the miniature' was originally as a molding nurse white set that was joined Takashi Yamazaki supervision also are using a similar technique I saw a story that. Is this quite orthodox?

Miike:
After all, Japanese movies have less budget and time than Hollywood movies, so it is faster to check them in kind. Even in the United States, I think that templates are being made for consideration, so I think it is not a Japanese-only method. However, if it's a Japanese movie, it would be better to use analog to make CG. Of course, there will be a lot of CG works that do not go through such a process, and I think that success depends on various situations. It is not always bad because we do not make miniatures, and there may be cases where making miniatures does not work (laugh)

G:
Indeed, it is (laughs)

Miike:
However, we always start with analog, so we always have a policy that incorporating the good parts of miniatures would be beneficial as a whole. After that, I took material shots and shot smoke and snow with a special effects group for synthesis.

G:
We talked about the budget, but now, if you do everything in miniature, the budget will be higher.

Miike:
That's right. When CG began to appear in the video industry, it was like 'one million yen per cut' and it was expensive. The technology has progressed steadily, and now it is more expensive to call a special effects staff and shoot miniatures, and CG is cheaper. Also, since CG has more flexibility in angle, it has the advantage that it can be flexibly handled at the editing stage. However, in terms of the fact that the guarantee of quality cannot be seen unless CG is completed, from a person who has been familiar with miniatures like us, it is more reliable to put in the goodness of miniatures.

G:
In terms of how to raise the quality, there is also a part that leads to quality assurance as a whole production team ...

Miike:
The CG section could be made from scratch without a miniature, but it would be helpful if you had one. It's about recognizing each other's goodness and trying to get good luck.



G:
In this work, the important scene alongside the nuclear power plants is the opening tsunami scene. You said that it took about a year to make it. Which process is taking the longest time?

Miike:
First of all, the project started with

Setsuro Wakamatsu and the producers working very early on, but our technical staff joined in 2018 when he was an adult. At that stage, the script for the preparation was completed. So, at the stage of the review draft, I created a storyboard about what kind of video is needed for special effects and VFX.

Storyboard and script written by Miike. This is the final draft.



G:
Yes.

Miike:
It's our role to make the picture on the script, which is only text, a concrete visual, so we first create a storyboard. I consult with Director Wakamatsu about what kind of cuts are necessary, and I'm going to be more specific, but of course, budget and time are involved, so I can't do everything I want to do. From that, we decided how far to visualize.



G:
Indeed, I narrow down at that point.

Miike:
The tsunami scene was at the beginning and was considered 'essential' from an early stage. VFX's main component is Shirogumi, and it's a historic company to which the previously mentioned director Takashi Yamazaki also belongs. This time, the team from Sangenjaya, who did '

Shin Godzilla ' (2016), was in charge. What I give is really the picture itself, but I got a pre-vis which is a 'moving storyboard' in a white group, and it was around summer 2018. The CG team starts to move once the cut splits take shape, but the tsunami part is not quite ready ... The shooting of Wakamatsu Gumi has been starting in the fall of 2018, and it was full crank up in January 2019, but the shooting was Even after finishing, the series of tsunamis did not seem to be very concrete, and it seems that one year later, after the summer of 2019, it has finally become visible. In the end, it took almost the end of dubbing to put in the sound.

G:
Oh……

Miike:
In the simulation of water, for example, the sea and rivers can be drawn realistically with CG without a sense of incongruity, but the tsunami sweeps away various things, and the washed away objects collide with each other and the splashes splash, which is a very complicated process. It took The quality shouldn't be as inferior to that of Hollywood movies as spectacle footage, but since we're watching real tsunami footage in news footage, we can't tell an overly lie. I'm very particular about that, and even though the drawing is a very detailed one, the customer may not be able to see it if it's too detailed, but I'm also getting the car to be washed away. It took me a year to do the physical simulation.

G:
The tsunami news footage was really shocking at the time. Is there a big difference between what was drawn in the storyboard and what was ultimately turned into a video?

Miike:
I agree. We trusted the Sumigumi team, but it was difficult to understand how far we could finally bring it. The goal is to have a quality that is comparable to that of Hollywood movies, but at the same time, the skills of the people who work and how far they can be given in the given time. After the shooting of the main part, will you start editing?

G:
Yes.

Miike:
Even at the editing stage, there is very little progress from the rough picture of Previs, so everyone comes along with an atmosphere like 'What is CG? Is it OK?' Because I am the VFX manager, please explain like 'I'm getting better, please give me a little more time, it's okay, please wait.'

G:
Hoho.

Miike:
Then there was a picture that was made quite early, only one cut. When I showed the one cut to Director Wakamatsu, he said, 'This is amazing.' I was told, 'Let's extend it a little bit (seconds)' (laugh)

G:
Oh.

Miike:
CG cuts are created in a fixed number of seconds, so it's not easy to stretch them. If it's a video shot in the field, it can be easily stretched because it has been cut before and after editing. But one cut was so good, and I was able to get the trust of Director Wakamatsu and convince me, 'The more time I have, the better the picture will be.'

G:
What was the one cut that Wakamatsu was convinced?

Miike:
The first cut from the side where the tsunami hits the building.

G:
It also appears in the trailer. Certainly, it was a powerful video that the director could say, 'Let's stretch a little more.' Naturally, the tsunami scene is not a copy of a news video, but a completely new one.

Movie 'Fukushima 50' (Fukushima Fifty) Trailer-YouTube


Miike:
Yes. It's all CG simulation.

G:
You mentioned earlier that you are also simulating the collision of a car swept away in the tsunami, but was it determined at the time of the storyboard that such a car was involved?

Miike:
I agree. The details that could not be understood from the picture alone were explained verbally in a meeting with the CG department. Another important point is that it is a 'black wave'. He said that he wanted to draw it because it was a terribly thick wave that involved mud.



G:
Mr. Wakamatsu was convinced of that one cut, but how did Miike feel when he saw the completed cut?

Miike:
Since the quality of CG images is gradually improved, even if checked every other week, it does not change dramatically. So, looking at the first cut of the tsunami, I felt reassured that it would be okay if all the cuts went this far. However, I couldn't tell if the quality of the other paintings would improve as well, so I was worried and felt like 'I'll do my best until the last minute.'

G:
Did it finally meet your expectations?

Miike:
I really think that the white group and the picture elements have done their best. I use a lot of inconspicuous VFX cuts that customers other than tsunami and hydrogen explosion do not notice, but they are all good. There is no doubt that the power of the art and decoration clubs has improved the quality of this movie. The first shoot was an open set of the reactor building in Suwa in the fall of 2018, and I cranked in from the place where the debris was scattered after the tsunami surged, but the first time I went to the site, the breathtaking presence There was a feeling. I've been working with a number of art artists, Mr. Seshita and Mr. Nobuhiro Akitaya, but this work has been even more empowered.

G:
So that's it.

Miike:
After that, I entered the Kadokawa Daiei Studio and shot the central control room, and immediately after the beginning of 2019, the seismic isolation building, the director's room, etc., but the reproducibility was amazing anyway. . There was a real stage that seems to be a documentary. On the other hand, our VFX part has to make things that are not in the place with CG, but with the quality that is not defeated by art, even a little more realistic, as if the customer was there The goal was to be able to experience it.

G:
Yes.

Miike:
However, as for the tsunami, the height is slightly higher than the actual height of the waves due to the introduction. Although it is based on a true story, it is an inflated part as a movie. It's a re-creation, and it takes a lot of omissions and deformations to show a four-day story in two hours.

G:
So that's it.

Miike:
The movie has already been released on Friday, March 6, and you can hear various comments and opinions. It is natural that such works have a strong message, so that people who are interested in their positions and insights may not be convinced that they are 'unreal' or 'I can't draw here'. I think. However, the important thing is that there was such a serious threat to Japan in Fukushima, and people born and raised there faced their lives. As a result, the building exploded, releasing radioactive material to the outside, so it was not very successful, but it is true that such people prevented the worst case of containment explosion.

G:
The struggle of the 50 remaining people at the nuclear power plant, which is also in the title.

Miike:
I agree. The behavior of those who were at nuclear power is not a cool heroism. But we know that no one can cope if we escape, and it's true that those who were left with unavoidable desires to manage their lives. That is the main theme of this movie. Also, people tend to shy away from these kinds of subjects, but if it can be left in the form of a movie, it is meaningful. Absolutely not a clean movie. It is impossible, it has not been solved yet, there will be people who have discomfort there, and there are many people who do not like the connection between the image of nuclear power and Fukushima itself. But in the long run, filming was something that someone would have to do, so I was involved as one of the staff.

G:
It's not a documentary, but it's not 'entertainment', so I can't say 'I want you to see it easily', but I can't help but keep looking away. The scene of the tsunami, which was created over the course of a year, is hard to see for some people because it is drawn with force.

Miike:
I decided to consult with Director Wakamatsu during the preparation period. The director told me that it was actually happening, and that the tsunami was a big accident as one of the triggers, so it is better to draw it properly. We avoided footage that could be swallowed by the tsunami, but dared to put in places where water would fall on those who were going up the stairs. Some people actually lost their lives in the building. We know through the news that there are people, but we didn't know how they actually worked. It's terrible to be trying to get around in the dark, fumbling state.

G:
First of all, because the instrument was down, there was no way to know the numbers at the site, the message game of that number was not working well, and looking back in this way, how did the reporting at that time be done like this? The struggle in the field was an impression that was not easily transmitted to the press.

Miike:
Many people who were born and raised in Fukushima worked as staff, but responded to groping after the loss of power, rushed into a dark building where aftershocks did not stop, explosion of Unit 1, and there were The fear faced by people is unimaginable. And it's a huge decision to vent radioactive materials into their hometowns with their own hands.

G:
After the movie was released, the then Prime Minister, Naoto Kan,

blogged about the exchanges omitted in the movie and responded in interviews . I think that being able to draw testimony on this occasion again may be an achievement of this work release.

Miike:
There is a feeling that various perspectives will be talked about and do not want the accident to be weathered, but on the other hand, the wound is coated with salt in that it is a work that reminds me of the image of `` Fukushima Equal Nuclear Power Plant '' I think some locals will feel like they are.

G:
Even if beautiful cherry blossoms come out, it is not a happy ending where everything is rounded, so it may be that you feel extra painful.

Miike:
It seems that some people receive the last scene of cherry blossom trees as if they were calm, but the cherry blossoms bloom every spring, but people who lived there cannot see them. There is still an area where it is difficult to return to Tomioka Town, which appears during the work, so the reality is that the effects of the accident are still continuing.

According to the Fukushima Prefecture official website, the specific difficult-to-return areas are as follows as of March 10, 2020 (Tuesday)

Evacuation Area-Fukushima Reconstruction Station-Fukushima Homepage
https://www.pref.fukushima.lg.jp/site/portal/list271-840.html



G:
Spring is coming to Fukushima, but it's a beautiful picture ...

Miike:
But there is no traffic. Once upon a time, Yonomori Park was a famous place for cherry blossoms, and many people gathered every year. In the movie, the appearance along the road that comes out before going to the cherry blossom trees is the scenery of Tomioka town that was actually shot in 2019.

G:
Is that local, not CG?

Miike:
Yes, that's exactly what it looks like now. The people who lived there were evacuated immediately after the disaster and couldn't return for a long time. With the building still in a broken state, grass and grass are growing, and it can't even be demolished. That is the reality of Fukushima today.

G:
Like the aerial photography of the nuclear power plant before the earthquake, it might be a CG ...

Miike:
The filming of this movie was really blessed with respect to the weather. There was no problem with the weather of the open set of Suwa taken for about a week, and the SDF Kisarazu garrison had permission to shoot in advance, so it is not easy to say `` Because the weather is bad, tomorrow '' is. All that important day was fine. The place where the U.S. military helicopter at Yokota base flies is fine and the cherry blossoms can be read to some extent during the blooming season. Was. Because the wind is blowing, the cherry blossoms are also shaking. It is difficult to express a natural shake in composition. I was really lucky.

G:
When you shoot at Yokota Base, you are actually shooting a helicopter flying off the base.

Miike:
That's right. I handed the script and applied for permission in the United States. After all, the US military cooperated with me, so I think it's a special treatment because it's such a work. Of course, there were places where we 'cooperated', while others said that 'cooperation is difficult.' I don't have a touch when it comes to casting, but I think some actors may have been worried about performing because of their strong message. I think that Koichi Sato and Ken Watanabe came out well, and I think that KADOKAWA often made this kind of difficult subject.

G:
A movie released nine years after the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011, 'Nine years already' but 'Nine years still'.

Miike:
At the time of location hunting, I was shown various things around Tomioka town, but it was just after the disaster, such as government offices and elementary schools. At school, school bags are kept as they are. Time has stopped on that day. Although depicted in the movie, there are many people who have been obeyed by saying 'evacuation for the time being' and have not been able to return. At that time, you changed your life.

G:
surely…….

Miike:
We made it based on Takada Kadota 's original work, but it is the actual weight that we interviewed the parties, I think that the fear of the staff when electricity was lost at the nuclear power plant was amazing. . The nuclear power plant next to them is out of control, the meltdown is starting and the pressure is rising, but we have to stop. I tried to manage myself for four days without sleep, but in the meantime, there was a hydrogen explosion at Unit 1. That shock, the explosion sound …… After seeing that desperate situation, aren't you still on the scene ever since? And Unit 3 exploded. Still can not escape, can not escape. I think it is a tremendous sense of duty and a sense of mission. When I saw that news video, everyone felt shocked, saying, 'This may no longer be possible.' Still, there are some people who thought they had to do something and stayed beside the reactor, which is in itself a great thing.

G:
It is obvious that there are people on the helicopter where water is sprayed from the Self-Defense Force helicopter, but I thought that there were so many people in the building underneath. It's natural to say, but it's a surprise.

Miike:
That's right. Also, there is a tubular cooling system called Supchan (suppression chamber), and the reactor is surrounded by concrete, but Sapchan is right next to the reactor vessel in concrete. Therefore, the amount of radioactive material was not odd, and I think that the feeling that it was not comfortable to live for those who rushed toward it was serious. You already know when it will explode.

G:
To make it easier to convey in the movie, the interior of the building is dimly visible, but it was actually dark.

Miike:
Indeed, go to a passage where you wouldn't know anything without a flashlight, and beside the reactor where the radioactivity is being released, and open the valve.

G:
We are watching and knowing that it has already melted down at this point ...

Miike:
A movie with many problems. So I think there will be various opinions. It is up to the customers to decide whether or not to come to the movie, but my wish is to have as many people as possible in Japan consider the reconstruction of Fukushima and Tohoku and increase the number of visitors. Fukushima Prefecture is also the hometown of the great director who brought up Japanese special effects director

Eiji Tsuburaya . It's Sukagawa city on Nakadori, not Hamadori, and a facility called Eiji Tsuburaya Museum opened there last year. And this year, the special effects archive center will be opened. This is one of the activities of ATAC (Anime Tokusatsu Archives Organization) , a non-profit organization established with Hideaki Anno and Shinji Higuchi in the wake of the SFX Museum . That's why I have been in Fukushima for the last 7-8 years. While talking with Fukushima, I really feel how much the nuclear accident has become a negative image for Fukushima Prefecture. So when I underwrote this work, I first thought of an acquaintance of Fukushima.

◆ About the special effects
G:
In the flow of the `` special effects museum '' mentioned earlier, Hideaki Anno in 2013 issued a message `` Please help the technique of special effects '' `` Survey report on Japanese special effects '' 7 was announced Year has passed. What do you see as a person standing on the front line?

Miike:
'SFX Museum' is a special exhibition that began in 2012 at the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo. This was a message that we were in danger of disappearing analog-style special effects, which we used to shoot on-site miniatures and objects that we were used to as children. Thanks to this exhibition, special effects using miniatures have been re-evaluated, and many special effects movie screenings and events have increased. But now, CG is the center of video production, and the miniature special effects are a minority. That flow cannot be changed anymore. However, that is the difference between means of drawing using miniatures and using CG, and CG is also a special effect in the sense of creating images that are not on the spot.

G:
Oh, yeah.

Miike:
CG technology is improving year by year, and the possibility of making even better works is increasing, so I think that the role of special effects and VFX will be needed in the future. However, it is difficult in the sense of 'special effects using miniatures'. On the production side, doing special effects with miniatures is not budget-friendly, and the possibilities of genres that CG can visualize are expanding. We're a special effects monster boom generation, so we're going to do a special effects museum with the aim of keeping the miniature special effects for a little longer, and we'll spare no effort as long as we can keep them.

G:
That's right.

Miike:
There are almost no movies or dramas that do not have a CG group. It's a change of seasons, and it's 'erasing', but it's useful for things like erasing things that can't be seen on site, so basically CG is used for any work. In that sense, it is a good era. It is now natural for ordinary dramas to take an actor with a green or blue background and create a different background. But when we were young, everyone didn't quite understand that kind of filming, and some actors were disgruntled with the feeling of 'Why do I act in such a place?' Now everyone is convinced by “I will put it in later with CG”, so I can shoot a synthetic back without any resistance.

G:
There is a feeling of another world.

Miike:
In that sense, the role of special effects = VFX has gained great social rights. The possibilities have been expanded by CG, and technically, it is progressing more and more. However, 'miniature special effects on an old scale' is honestly severe.

G:
There are various issues, such as money issues and schedule issues, but is there any advantage to miniature special effects?

Miike:
There is a good point that you can guarantee quality that can not be read with CG by taking a miniature shot, but it is impossible to say, 'Can you correct the angle from here a little more?' On the other hand, the weak point of CG is that a certain finishing time is required for the final texture. If you don't have the time or money to do it on this schedule, it will be quite miserable.

G:
'Up to the point where it was made ...'

Miike:
That's it. In that case, it can be said that the quality will improve if you take a certain amount of miniature and take a picture, but from the budget scale, it is easier to do the budget with CG.

G:
It is difficult without the concept of 'using miniature special effects this time' as a concept.

Miike:
Even in Hollywood, there are works that make images with model animations that occasionally shoot one frame at a time. For example, Tim Burton's Nightmare Before Christmas (1993) and Tim Burton's Corpse Bride (2005), or Leica's KUBO Two Strings Secrets (2016). However, that is based on the shooting method. Dolls are needed to make a picture with model animation, and the background is a miniature set. So, if a work aiming at such a taste is made in Japan, there may be a turn. Such works are not 100% on-site paintings, but they are quite CG digitally processed. While giving out a handmade analog feeling, I also take advantage of digital goodies.

G:
The reason why such a work is not made in Japan ...

Miike:
It takes time and money because everything must be made from scratch (laughs). The Japanese movie market is definitely in the Japanese-speaking world, and it is mainly in Japan. Occasionally there will be some works that can be sold overseas, but basically you have to collect them in Japan. In that case, the budget size is inevitably reduced and it is impossible to reach the global market.

G:
So that's it.

Miike:
Also, ' Wallace and Gromit ' in the UK is a clay animation, replacing dolls with different shapes and making tremendous effort. If there is such a work as a project, there is also a miniature turn. At NHK, a young writer is making a time-lapse work for about 5 minutes with ' Bubble wrap animation '. However, when it comes to a movie that is over an hour long, it is difficult to invest money in preparation for that scale.

G:
The technology has been taken over.

Miike:
There are still people who like and want to do it, but the fact that there are few places to be active is probably the limit of the Japanese market.

G:
Of puppet animation artist Magasato Fumiko from san, 'published in 1979 Nutcracker is later', that there is no chance of the three-dimensional animation work was asked to talk you may be. It was 2013, and for the next seven years, is the situation surrounding you severe?

Interview with puppet animation writer, Fumiko Makari about Japanese three-dimensional animation ancestor Tadashi Mochinaga and production techniques-gigazine



Miike:
I agree.

G:
If so, I'd like to see something like 'This is the culmination of miniature special effects' at some point ...

Miike:
It really is! KADOKAWA, please.

G:
Thank you for all kinds of talks today.

The movie 'Fukushima 50' has been released to the theater since Friday, March 6, 2020.

Movie `` Fukushima 50 '' special video-YouTube


Movie `` Fukushima 50 '' special video ②-YouTube


in Interview,   Video,   Movie, Posted by logc_nt