Self-portrait images using photo filters have been found to reduce the number of “likes”, and how to increase the number of “likes”?


By

Apostolos Vamvouras

Instagram has a “photo filter” that automatically processes the photos you take, so anyone can easily make color corrections and change the impression of the photos you post. However, research has shown that images using such photo filters have a lower number of likes .

Do you filter who you are ?: Excessive self-presentation, social cues, and user evaluations of Instagram selfies-ScienceDirect
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0747563219303711

Using filters on your selfies results in FEWER likes on Instagram, study claims | Daily Mail Online
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7911265/Using-filters-selfies-results-FEWER-likes-Instagram-study-claims.html

A research team at Rowan University in the United States obtained a search for '#Selfie (selfie)' on Instagram to find out how the use of photo filters affects the number of likes on Instagram. We analyzed 1873 images excluding 'images without faces' and 'commercial images'. Of the collected images, about 90% were women, about 50% were white, about 25% were Hispanic, about 18.8% were Asian, and about 4.6% were African American.



The survey found that images with stickers and images with excessive color filters had fewer “likes” than images without filters. The researchers pointed out that this result was caused by other users seeing the processed image as 'counterfeiting'. 'Images with the intent to emphasize only good aspects tend to discourage tapping and commenting on Likes,' said lead author Dr. Seoyeon Hong. Did.

The research team also conducted research on patterns of “photos that resonated well”. As a result, it was found that images that include 'social information' such as work, hobbies, and human relationships get the most 'likes'. In particular, posts that clarify their work, hobbies, and financial status are likely to receive a lot of “likes”. According to the British letter Daily Mail, which reported the news, 'Photos containing social information make people think' I have a desire to engage with others 'and give a positive impression.' I am.


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Dr. Hong said, 'Self-photographs may not produce the response you intended, so you should be careful.' You should post images that contain social information. '

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